Feeds

2011: annus horribilis for Microsoft and RIM

Google's year instead

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

It's hard to know who has had a worse 2011. Microsoft, because during the first ten months of the year, its old OS outsold its new one? Or RIM, because its market share has more than halved during the same period?

Both numbers, centred on the US smartphone biz, come from local market watcher NPD.

Its figures, for January through October, put Microsoft's market share at five per cent. That's two per cent for Windows Phone 7, but three per cent for Windows Mobile, an OS not update for several years, seen as well behind the curve and, more pertinently, the operating system WinPho 7 was intended to replace.

Still, it fared better than Symbian and Palm OS/WebOS, both of which took single percentage market shares, according to NPD - and we suspect both were rounded up.

Neither has had a significant share for years - since 2006 in the case of the Nokia-owned OS, and since 2008 for Palm devices. Now that HP was open-sourced WebOS, perhaps its fortunes will revive, but it's hard to see Symbian's US presence going anywhere but further down.

RIM is undoubtedly praying it won't follow Symbian. Its market share peaked in 2009, when RIM's BlackBerry took 44 per cent of the market. That share fell to 25 per cent in 2010 and, on the basis of what NPD's numbers show, it'll be down to ten per cent in 2011.

Of course, back in 2009 far fewer smartphones were sold than was the case in 2011, so RIM's decline is relative. But with world smartphone shipments up 74.4 per cent between 2009 and 2010, according to IDC, another market watcher, and likely to rise again between 2011 and 2010, the plunge doesn't look good for RIM.

Google and Apple, on the other hand, have every right to feel smug. Google's share has rising from nine per cent in 2009, to 42 per cent in 2010 and 53 per cent for 2011, based on NPD's ten-month figure.

iOS' dipped last year under the Android onslaught, slipping from 24 per cent in 2009 to 21 per cent. This year it's back up again, to 29 per cent.

That's OS, of course. The Google share can be divided among multiple vendors - there is only one supplier of iOS devices, so clearly Apple is the US' biggest smartphone vendor, for now. Samsung, for one, isn't far behind, and may yet eclipse Apple this year. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management
How using vulnerability assessments to identify exploitable weaknesses and take corrective action can reduce the risk of hackers finding your site and attacking it.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.