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The trend for mobile working has fuelled demand for desktop virtualisation, says a survey by Citrix as employers want to know that their out-of-office workforce are on secure machines.

As employees increasingly work from home, or Starbucks, companies want ways to keep their devices and data secure. Desktop virtualisation is seen as one answer: 86 percent of the international companies surveyed by Citrix, a cloud provider, cited security as their primary motivation for getting into the area. Device, app and data security were top advantages of the technology, as well as the ability to remotely wipe computers.

55% of the companies surveyed expect to roll out desktop virtualisation deployments for the first time by 2013.

Desktop virtualisation is seen as a tool that will help keep the sys admin in control even when the computers are out of his reach. The advantages cited by the IT professionals included:

- 74 percent envisage using desktop virtualization to instantly update an entire enterprise’s network of PC and computing devices
- 66 percent cite the secure delivery of applications and data as a critical security capability that led to their decision to implement desktop virtualization
- 61 percent said Compliance requirements are also a key driver to adoption
- 53 percent citing activity monitoring, logging and reporting as important capabilities delivered by desktop virtualization.

The survey questioned 1100 IT professionals in 11 countries including Europe, the US, Brazil, China and India and was carried out on behalf of Citrix by Vanson Bourne in October 2011. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

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