YouTube takes music royalties seriously

Acquires RightsFlow to take it to the next level

New York music royalty outfit RightsFlow has been acquired by Google for integration into YouTube.

YouTube will incorporate RightsFlow’s technology management system to help navigate the complex territory of music publishing royalties. RightsFlow CEO Patrick Sullivan said in a blog statement that YouTube “shares in our vision of solving the really challenging problem of copyright management."

YouTube described RightsFlow as being at the forefront of solving the complex issues of licensing and royalty payment management.

After taking a fair share of legal wrangles on as the YouTube platform developed, the video sharing giant claimed that it had a longstanding commitment to solving “the really tough challenges around online copyright—how to manage content rights in a quickly evolving technology world.”

“We’ve already invested tens of millions of dollars in content management technology such as Content ID and, with over 3,000 major media companies using it, we’ve come a long way in just a few years. But we want to keep pushing things forward,” YouTube product manager David King said.

YouTube said that the acquisition would help to more rapidly and efficiently license music on the platform and make it easier for copyright owners to manage their content online.

Sullivan said that teaming with the worldwide platform and reach of YouTube, RightsFlow would now be able to drive awareness, adoption, and licensing success to a much larger audience.

“We remain committed to the highest standards of service and innovation. Our goals remain to enable the monetization of music and content consumption, to simplify the complexities surrounding copyright compliance, and to ensure that creators are paid for the use of their work,” he added. ®

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