Feeds

Steve Jobs' last design: New Apple HQ pics

Doughnut of doom

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Those who think that Apple is a strange cult will only have their suspicions confirmed by the recently released renderings of Apple's new Cupertino HQ published online yesterday.

Apple HQ 1, credit Cupertino Council

We've seen hazy pics of the building before, but the official images have just been posted on the Cupertino Council's website as part of the planning permission for the building due to go up in 2014.

Apple HQ 2, credit Cupertino Council

Apple is the biggest taxpayer in Cupertino, something Jobs rammed home at a planning permission meeting earlier this year, so the council seems happy to push ahead with the ambitious scheme that plonks a dramatic dark ring of a building on a site currently occupied by some Hewlett Packard buildings and warehouses.

Apple HQ 3, credit Cupertino Council

With a projected floorspace of 3 million square feet, the HQ will have space for 12,000 employees, with a canteen that can hold 3,000.

The San Fran Weekly dubbed the building a "massive glass doughnut", but it's just a pity that the dark colour of the glass (thought to mean that it is using solar power) make it look, from certain angles, more a doughnut of doom than a doughnut of creativity. Jobs boasted that there would not be a straight piece of glass in the whole building; it is all curved and seamlessly connected. And the trees will be largely apricots, if you're wondering.

Judging from the images, it will be accompanied by young languorous types lying around in poppy fields.

Apple HQ 4, credit Cupertino Council

The images are infused with a late-in-the-day sunlight and and otherworldly air which makes the Cupertino office seem more like a spaceship or illustration from a leaflet advertising the Mormons than anything involving the normal definition of the word "office". It's what Steve would have wanted.

Apple HQ 5, credit Cupertino Council

We learn from The New Yorker that Steve Jobs specially designed it so that the windows can't open, because he doesn't like that kind of thing.

The architects wanted the windows to open. Jobs said no. He had never liked the idea of people being able to open things. ‘That would just allow people to screw things up.’

®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display
Shaves price, not screen on mid-2014 model
iPhone 6 flip tip slips in Aussie's clip: Apple's 'reversible USB' leaks
New plug not compatible with official Type-C, according to fresh rumors
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.