Feeds

Tax dept staff are HM's biggest e-learners

Friggin tax-collecting boffins know too much!

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

HMRC staff took more than 615,000 e-learning courses last year...

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is making more use of e-learning than other departments, according to a report by the National Audit Office.

The document says the NAO estimates that HMRC spent £96m in 2010-11 developing the skills of its staff. Most training courses were manual based, but there was also a "significant" use of e-learning and less face-to-face classroom training than elsewhere in government.

Previous research, published in the NAO's report on Whitehall's skills requirements in July, found that in other departments more than twice as many delegate days are committed to the classroom as e-learning.

Figures in the NAO's latest report show that HMRC offered staff 359 face-to-face courses, 723 e-learning courses and 955 manual based courses. But the number of courses taken by staff in e-learning exceeded the other two types: 615,305 against 77,788 for manual-based courses and 37,493 in face-to-face.

The average number of staff on each course was 851 for e-learning, against 81 for manual based and 104 for face-to-face.

However, the NAO says that the department's online learning system, which it uses to monitor all training activity, is not used effectively. Data on informal learning, including coaching and mentoring, is not captured.

Overall, the report says that only 54 per cent of staff said that they were able to access the right learning and development opportunities when they needed to and only 38 per cent said that training had improved their performance.

Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said: "At the level of the business as a whole, HMRC has no strategy to manage the £96m it spends each year on skills.

"Although the department is doing much to make sure it has the skills it requires, it needs a more systematic approach, where spending on skills is linked explicitly to the organisation's overall business objectives and a vision of how it should look in the future."

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.