Feeds

NoSQL hopeful cozies up to Hadoop data-muncher

Big data love-in

Remote control for virtualized desktops

NoSQL data store CouchDB has become Hadoop’s latest convert with delivery of a connector tying together the two big-data architectures.

CouchDB user Couchbase has announced a certified Couchbase Hadoop Connector, developed with Hadoop shop Cloudera.

The connector potentially simplifies movement of data between the Couchbase Server, which Couchbase says is "powered" by CouchDB, and the Cloudera Distribution including Hadoop (CDH). Couchbase uses capabilities of CouchDB such as mobile and sync. Both CouchDB and Hadoop, meanwhile, are Apache Software Foundation (ASF) projects.

The connector does this using Sqoop, a plug-in that's an Apache incubator project. Sqoop can stream data from the Couchbase system to the Cloudera Hadoop distribution.

According to Couchbase, the Sqoop addition will enable both consistent application performance and heavy MapReduce data-crunching of data sets.

The plug-in targets web applications such as ads targeting, where low-latency is needed along with high throughput.

The Hadoop Connector was certified via Cloudera’s Certified Technology program.

Couchbase wasn't the only one cozying up to Hadoop this week. Open-source enterprise data integration start-up Talend announced that version 5 of its suite features enhanced support for Hadoop's data warehouse Hive, the Pig data analysis tool and Sqoop.

Couchbase is closely aligned with the NoSQL crowd. It uses and supports the CouchDB document store with employees such as Jan Lenhardt still contributing to the CouchDB Apache project. Couchbase also utilizes Memcached in its Membase Server. The company's customers include the BBC and Zynga.

CouchDB recently made the news when it was dropped from Canonical's Ubuntu One service after Canonical tried and failed to make the document store scale to millions of users and databases over a period of three years.

Cloudera is home to Hadoop founder Doug Cutting. Hadoop was inspired by Google’s MapReduce for large-scale data-munching.

Cloudera was first to deliver productisation and support for Hadoop, but was this year joined by Yahoo! spin out Hortonworks. The latter has this year worked with Microsoft to develop a Hadoop plug-in for Microsoft’s SQL Server, a move that has ended the life of Microsoft’s own big data cruncher, Dryad. ®

This article has been updated to clarify Couchbase's use and support for CouchDB.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?