Feeds

Ranting Iranian TV fined £100k for shoddy interview

Ofcom repeats threat to revoke 'news' channel's licence

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

Despite ranting for months that it was going to be pulled off the air, Press TV has actually been hit with a fine of £100,000 for shoddy reporting, as expected.

But that has not stopped the channel claiming Ofcom has reversed its decision, and convincing The Guardian of that too: proving the maxim that if you state something enough times everyone will come to believe it. But the fine is what we expected, though the channel is going to have to relocate its management to the UK as well.

While investigating the circumstances around the interview with Newsweek journalist Maziar Bahari, which led to the £100,000 fine, Ofcom discovered that Press TV was being run almost entirely from Tehran, and not by the UK subsidiary which holds the broadcast licence. That's against the rules, and did result in a threat of revocation unless control is passed to the UK within 35 days.

The state-funded Press TV styles itself as an alternative news source, and certainly reading the headlines one might think oneself in an alternative universe. A universe where media coverage of UK strikes is subject to a government-imposed blackout, all police animals are "snarling attack dogs" and Britons are up in arms about Obama referring to the British Embassy as "English": it's enough to make a Daily Mail reader blush.

Back in the real world, Press TV broadcast an interview without sufficient background, giving an inaccurate impression [PDF] of the subject, for which the channel has been fined £100,000. Meanwhile Press TV has also been ordered to transfer control of the station to the body which holds the licence, or risk losing that licence.

But that's a lot less interesting than conspiracy theories involving foreign-office pressure, state control and the preponderance of pro-Israeli feeling in the higher echelons of Ofcom. ®

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.