Feeds

HP plays Violin to whip Itanium beasts into flash frenzy

Chip arrays to accelerate hot storage, says insider

Security for virtualized datacentres

HP has signed a deal with Violin Memory to flog shared flash memory arrays to its Itanium customers, El Reg has learned.

HP produces and sells Itanium-based systems, running HP-UX, OpenVMS and NonStop, through its Business Critical Systems operation to customers who need extreme high-availability, reliability and robustness from their servers.

Many of these customers run I/O-intensive applications, such as databases, that would benefit from being flash-accelerated. Violin Memory provides shared-access flash memory arrays in its 3000 and 6000 product lines, storing up to 32TB of data, and these answer I/O requests hundreds of times faster than spindle-bound hard disk drive arrays.

Flash memory's low latency and fast I/O responses should appeal to customers with I/O-bound Itanium systems if, and it's a big if, the chip array is reliable and robust enough to their standards. It looks as if HP and Violin are satisfied that this is so. And HP will soon extend its use of Violin products from competing in Oracle Exadata-type use cases to Itanium customers.

Mark Payne, EMEA VP for HP's Business Critical Systems, wasn't able to comment on the matter. An independent and reliable source did confirm that HP and Violin have an Itanium relationship.

David Donatelli, EVP and GM for HP's Enterprise Servers, Storage, Networking and Technology Services, wouldn't comment on Itanium and Violin Memory specifically, but did say: "I think Violin [for HP] is a tactical solution. You'll see more non-volatile memory solutions coming from HP in time. Non-volatile memory is going to play an increasing role in the industry."

He wouldn't discuss Memristor technology specifics with regard to this, but said: "I think it's really cool. You've got the rewrite-ability that is an issue with flash and performance is good."

Providing a flash array-assist for Itanium customers would give them more good news after the Odyssey project following Oracle's rejection of the platform.

Garry Veale, Violin's EMEA head, said there were no discussions between HP and Violin regarding Itanium customer use of Violin memory arrays. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.