Feeds

Anonymous launches OpRobinHood against banks

'We have come to take the 99%'s money back'

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Anonymous and other hacktivists have joined together to launch an attack on banks in response to recent crackdowns against the Occupy protest movement.

TeaMp0isoN and Anonymous are joining forces to run OpRobinHood, which will involve using stolen credit details to donate to charities and others, supposedly at the expense of banks.

In regards to the recent demonstrations and protests across the globe, we are going to turn the tables on the banks. Operation Robin Hood is going to return the money to those who have been cheated by our system and most importantly to those hurt by our banks. Operation Robin Hood will take credit cards and donate to the 99% as well as various charities around the globe. The banks will be forced to reimburse the people there [sic] money back.

Standard practice in cases where banks identify a fraudulent transaction is to reverse transactions and levy a chargeback – a reversal of a prior outbound transfer of funds. So while customers with compromised credit cards might not lose out, charities who receive fraudulent donations might actually end up out of pocket. 

TeaMp0isoN and Anonymous claim to have already taken Chase, Bank of America, and CitiBank credit cards with "big breaches across the map" and to have begun donating thousands to many protests around the world, as well as to homeless charities and other philanthropic organisations.

The hacktivists want bank account holders to withdraw their funds and deposit them in credit unions instead, something started with the legitimate Operation Cash Back scheme a few weeks ago. The hacktivists are not afraid to take on the banks, as their statement goes on to explain.

We are not afraid of the Police, Secret Service, or the FBI. We are going to show you banks are not safe and take our money back. We are going to hit the true evil while not harming their customers and helping others. We are not only starving the banks but are ready to start the attack. We have come to take the 99%'s money back. We are not asking permission.

TeaMp0isoN and Anonymous previously collaborated on the OpCensorThis rap song exercise, which the former was far more active in promoting than the latter. Anonymous needs little introduction. TeaMp0isoN is another (arguably more politically militant) hactivist group that's arguably most famous for defacing the BlackBerry blog around the time of the London riots.

. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN
Traffic fingerprints reveal all, say boffins
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.