Feeds

Ubuntu tells dumped CouchDB: It's not you, it's me

Cloud storage dalliance is over

Boost IT visibility and business value

NoSQL contender CouchDB's been dropped by Ubuntu's ambitious cloud synchronisation service.

The Linux distro said it has given up on the open-source CouchDB in Ubuntu One after three years trying and failing to make the document store scale to millions of users and databases.

Canonical's John Rowland Lenton said here: "Our situation is rather unique, and we were unable to resolve some of the issues we came across.

"We were thus unable to make CouchDB scale up to the millions of users and databases we have in our data centres, and furthermore we were unable to make it scale down to be a reasonable load on small client machines."

Lenton said Ubuntu One contacts, notes and play lists databases would continue to run on its servers but that direct external access to the underlying databases will be shut off.

Ubuntu One, introduced in 2010, is the Linux distro's online data and music service.

It gives you up to 20GB of online storage, lets you sync files between different devices and allows you to stream music to iPhone and Android devices.

CouchDB is the Erlang-based document storage system written by former Lotus-Notes developer Damien Katz, which in 2008 became an official project of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). Katz is CTO of the CouchDB support company Couchbase.

CouchDB is one of a crowed of NoSQL databases that have become popular in recent years because of their use in large-scale web properties including Facebook and Twitter; they promised to overcome the management and speed of data access "shortcomings" of relational database management systems. Such databases are now trying to pick up customers among the regular, enterprise crowd and such is the interest this opportunity has generated that database market leader Oracle has released what it claims is its own NoSQL database.

CouchDB is a document-oriented data storage system whose users include the BBC and parts of Facebook. It competes with NoSQL document store MongoDB. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.