Feeds

Pro-game MP rewrites Modern Warfare censure motion

Call of Duty gets Parliamentary praise

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The House of Commons has changed its opinion that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 mimics the London bombings, amending an Early Day Motion that proposed the BBFC take further precautions when allowing a game to be sold.

The revamped EDM now goes as far as to actually praise Activision's big-seller.

Labour MP Tom Watson (West Bromwich East) made his pro-game views known when he completely rewrote the Motion to say:

"That this House notes the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) gave the video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 an 18 classification, noting that 'the game neither draws upon nor resembles real terrorist attacks on the underground'."

It isn't easy to imagine parliamentary old boys bashing control pads and calling to each other, 'Oh darn it, it's actually rather jolly good isn't it, chaps?'

However, that could well be the case as the EDM now tips its top hat towards Activision claiming, "the game has an excellent user interface and challenges the gamers' dexterity as well as collaborative skills in an online setting".

Modern Warfare 3

It then declares the House "encourages the BBFC to uphold the opinion of the public that whilst the content of videogames may be unsettling or upsetting to some, adults should be free to choose their own entertainment in the absence of legal issues or material which raises a risk or harm".

Earlier this month, another Labour MP, Keith Vaz, and other MPs proposed to discuss sanctioning sales further. The original EDM read:

"This House is deeply concerned about the recently released video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, in which players engage in gratuitous acts of violence against members of the public; notes in particular the harrowing scenes in which a London Underground train is bombed by terrorists, bearing a remarkable resemblance to the tragic events of 7 July 2005; further notes that there is increasing evidence of a link between perpetrators of violent crime and violent video games users; and calls on the British Board of Film Classification to take further precautions when allowing a game to be sold."

The amendment is a triumph for pro-gamers, a middle finger up to luddites who prefer to blame social disturbance on button bashers in a virtual warzone, over their own governance shortcomings.

Then again, banning a videogame that made a quarter of a billion quid on its first day of sales would be a tall order, even for those who like to think they're pulling the strings. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?