Feeds

Facebook phone rises from the dead, again

'Hey, I've died twice'

High performance access to file storage

Facebook is working on a phone, and has called it "Buffy" in tribute to the impossibly-hard-to-kill vampire slayer of the same name, but don't expect to see it until 2014.

That's according to AllThingsD, which reports Facebook is working with HTC to have the phone ready for launch in 12 to 18 months. That seems a long time to spend sticking a "Facebook" button on the front of an Android handset, and one has to wonder why the social-networking giant feels it necessary to brand their own handset at all.

Facebook is already integrated into a range of low-end phones from Inq, as well as existing HTC handsets. The social network also forms a central plank of the Windows Phone "people" hub, and offers an Android application which attempts to push itself to the font at every opportunity.

But despite that, the company is apparently planning a forked version of Android tweaked to better integrate into the social experience, and plans to spend the next year working on it with a view to release early in 2014.

The idea is to focus on HTML 5 as the application platform, and "deeply integrate" Facebook, according to the omnipresent "sources familiar with the project".

Mobile is obviously very important to Facebook, and Google's stewardship of the leading iOS alternative should certainly be worrying Zuckerberg's empire: the Chocolate Factory's Google+ client for Android is much slicker than Facebook's equivalent. Google hasn't levered its inside knowledge of Android to push Google+ yet, and would probably face regulatory challenges if it did, but Facebook is right to be prepared to face any such move.

There's little doubt there will be a Facebook phone in the next 18 months – an Android handset with a Facebook client pre-installed and perhaps even a dedicated button to access it – but whether it will offer a significantly different experience than that offered on other Android devices is more debatable.

Facebook has branded phones before, and will continue to do so. But like Buffy's Sunnydale, they eventually disappear into a black hole of history until the next journalist is looking for a catchy headline to run with. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Ex–Apple CEO John Sculley: Ousting Steve Jobs 'was a mistake'
Twenty-nine years later, post-Pepsi exec has flat-forehead moment
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
Number crunching suggests Yahoo! US is worth less than nothing
China and Japan holdings worth more than entire company
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.