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Jaguar to Titan? Not so bad…

Keptacular Metamorphis

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At SC11 I had the opportunity to talk to some of the people responsible for the biggest computer upgrade known to man. Oak Ridge National Labs is upgrading its current Cray XT5 ‘Jaguar’ system to a Cray XT6 system that will be known as ‘Titan’.

It’s quite a facelift. Today, Jaguar is a 1.75 PFlop supercomputer with more than 18,000 nodes containing 224,162 cores of AMD 6-core Istanbul processors. In 2009, it was the first system to provide greater than a petaflop sustained performance, taking the number one slot on the Top500 list.

Two years later it’s not exactly a performance dog, but it’s been knocked down to number three on the list, supplanted by the Fujitsu 10.5 PFlop K Computer and China’s NUDT 2.56 PFlop Tianhe-1A.

The transition from Jaguar to Titan will be profound, with a performance boost to somewhere around 20 PFlops – which should put it somewhere near the top, it not the pinnacle, of the Top500. The biggest factor in the upgrade will be the move from a traditional CPU-based architecture to a hybrid CPU+GPU design.

In final form, which will be achieved next year, each of the 18,000+ Titan nodes will have one 16-core AMD Interlagos processor and a NVIDIA Kepler GPU accelerator. Titan will have many more CPU cores than Jaguar and the additional power provided by adding 18,000 Kepler GPUs in the mix. This will make Titan the largest hybrid supercomputer in the world – not just “GPU-riffic” but “Keptacular” as well. “Keptastic,” perhaps?

The biggest hurdle here isn’t the hardware; it’s the software, right? How the hell do you CUDA-ize the hundreds of applications and millions of lines of code that are running on Jaguar and will need to run on Titan? Not surprisingly, Cray and pals NVIDIA, PGI, and CAPS have been pondering this one. They’ve come up with OpenACC, and are presenting it as a parallel programming standard.

What OpenACC does is allow programmers to insert ‘directives’ into their code that will alert the compiler to routines that should be parallelized – sent to multiple cores or to accelerators. The compiler does the work, and the programmer doesn’t have to change any of the underlying code (other than adding directives, that is, and there are tools that help them do this too.)

I don’t pretend to know any of the ins and outs of writing parallel applications (well, I do pretend to know it if I’m certain that I’m talking to people who are dumber than I am), but a presentation from Cray’s John Levesque gave me some idea of how well OpenACC works.

One of his examples was the relative performance of their CAM-SE when using different methods to gain CUDA-ization. On the current system, the CAM-SE REMAP function took 65.30 minutes to complete. Or was it seconds? (He went damned fast in the presentation, and I was in the back, but we’re talking relative performance.)

After a rewrite in anticipation for porting to an accelerator, they knocked it down to about 33.5. Hand-coding the resulting code for CUDA got them to 10.2 – a very significant speed-up. Taking the same rewritten code and running it through OpenACC gave them a 10.6 runtime – very close to hand-coded performance.

The cool thing about OpenACC is that it’s portable and chip agnostic. Using it will enable better parallelism on general purpose multi-core CPUs as well as GPU accelerators. Here’s the NVIDIA press release with some more details.

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