Feeds

Make it easy for biz to report cyber robberies, say MPs

Backdoor broken into? Why not call ... the police!

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

Ten British MPS are calling on the UK.gov to make it easier for companies to report cybercrime to the relevant authorities.

Members from a whole bunch of parties – two MPs from the Labour, Conservative and Lib Dem parties and one each from the DUP, SDLP, Plaid Cymru and one Independent – are backing the early day motion that hopes to get Parliament to debate the current lack of an efficient method for businesses to let the right people know when they have been the victim of a cybercrime.

According to the motion, 40 per cent of cybercrimes committed against firms currently go unreported, but 85 per cent of businesses in Scotland and England say they would report the incidents if "they felt that there was a sufficient and dedicated mechanism to do so".

The MPs also said that although the Met in London has a dedicated e-crime unit, there was no direct access for assistance or reporting by companies and "standard methods of reporting are proving ineffective".

The politicians want the government to set up a way for businesses and individuals to report cybercrime to the most appropriate bodies and establish forums for companies to meet and discuss the issue and how to best protect themselves.

Early day motions are the first sign that any topic might get a place in Parliamentary debate, but a lot of the ideas fall by the wayside if they don't get enough support. However, considering that this motion went from three supporters on Monday to 10 on Wednesday, it just might get its day. ®

Bootnote

It seems that technology is preying on the mind of Lib Dem MP for Colchester Bob Russell, since his name is attached to this cybercrime motion as well as the motion that expressed deep concern over video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, particularly in reference to scenes in which a London Underground train is bombed.

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.