Make it easy for biz to report cyber robberies, say MPs

Backdoor broken into? Why not call ... the police!

Ten British MPS are calling on the UK.gov to make it easier for companies to report cybercrime to the relevant authorities.

Members from a whole bunch of parties – two MPs from the Labour, Conservative and Lib Dem parties and one each from the DUP, SDLP, Plaid Cymru and one Independent – are backing the early day motion that hopes to get Parliament to debate the current lack of an efficient method for businesses to let the right people know when they have been the victim of a cybercrime.

According to the motion, 40 per cent of cybercrimes committed against firms currently go unreported, but 85 per cent of businesses in Scotland and England say they would report the incidents if "they felt that there was a sufficient and dedicated mechanism to do so".

The MPs also said that although the Met in London has a dedicated e-crime unit, there was no direct access for assistance or reporting by companies and "standard methods of reporting are proving ineffective".

The politicians want the government to set up a way for businesses and individuals to report cybercrime to the most appropriate bodies and establish forums for companies to meet and discuss the issue and how to best protect themselves.

Early day motions are the first sign that any topic might get a place in Parliamentary debate, but a lot of the ideas fall by the wayside if they don't get enough support. However, considering that this motion went from three supporters on Monday to 10 on Wednesday, it just might get its day. ®

Bootnote

It seems that technology is preying on the mind of Lib Dem MP for Colchester Bob Russell, since his name is attached to this cybercrime motion as well as the motion that expressed deep concern over video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, particularly in reference to scenes in which a London Underground train is bombed.

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