Feeds

Too rude for the road: DVLA hot list of banned numberplates

What idiot would buy PE12 VRT anyway?

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The Register has obtained a list of the rudest words you'll never see on car number plates: the official list of banned registration marks from the Drivers and Vehicles Licensing Authority (DVLA).

We almost don't want to sully the pure reputation of our website by publishing all the combinations of letters and numbers on our pages, but we believe in focusing our unflinching gaze on the truth so we decided to share some of them here.

DVLA bans registration marks that could potentially cause offence. A DVLA spokesperson said: "Having reviewed the appropriateness of these registration marks we have withdrawn these marks as they could cause offence or embarrassment on the grounds of political or racial sensitivities or are in poor taste."

The authority will from time to time add others. Chesterfield resident Alan Clarke was ordered to change the number plate on his Land Rover in June this year after it was discovered to read "BO11 LUX". The DVLA initially agreed to its registration only to request its removal weeks later.

Some of the banned marks are quite simply just offensive to minority groups, others are words related to crime – MU12 DER (murder) or PE12 ADO (pea do) – and religion – KO12 ANN (Koran) and TO12 AHH (Torah) are both banned.

NA12 ZEE (Nazi) and PE12 VRT (Pervert) are also out. So is VA61 NOB – for obvious reasons – as are multiple variations of the homophobic insult "fag". And no, you can't have a car registration plate with JE12 KOF on it.

Some milder words are banned too, we guess because they are particularly inappropriate in a driving context LE61 ESS (legless) or DD12 UNK (drunk).

More obscure bits of slang relating to gangs are out too: including YA12 DEE and YA12 DES – Yardy, British Jamaican slang for someone from a gang or a prison mate. TR12 ADS and TR12 DDS (Triads) are also on the blacklist.

OK, go wash your eyes out. ®

Update

The DVLA has got back to us to say that "in July, having reviewed [Alan Clarke's] case, we reversed our decision and Mr Clarke was notified that he could retain his number".

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?