Feeds

Star Wars 3D holo displays becomes a reality

Obi-Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Boffins are one step closer to making R2-D2's holographic projector tech a reality, through a 3D display which makes images appear in mid-air with a rapidly moving laser beam.

True 3D Technology

Produced by Japanese outfit Burton and based on developments from AIST and Keio University, the display is able to produce around 50,000 'pixels' per second, with a frame-rate of roughly 10-15f/s.

The team is attempting to raise that figure to 24-30f/s.

The True 3D Display apparently works by focusing laser light to produce plasma excitation from the oxygen and nitrogen in the air, DigInfo.tv reports.

According to those behind the project, it is the world's first piece of kit to display images without the use of a screen. Have a ganders at the video below for further details and a clip of it in action:

The tech was on show at last month's Digital Contents Expo in Tokyo. Now, if they'd just project an image of a Princess Leia in distress, and squash it down to fit inside an Astro droid… ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?