Feeds

SingTel launches e-reader

Skoob-y snacks for publishing

The essential guide to IT transformation

Singapore Telecommunications has launched Singapore’s first e-book service, branded skoob.

The platform is aimed at servicing the local publishing market which SingTel claims has been overlooked by international e-book services.

The skoob service is available on Apple and Android tablets and smartphones via a free app. It can also be accessed via PCs and Macs using standard browsers.

Customers can download books on up to five devices and payments can be made via Singapore credit cards. SingTel customers can also choose to have purchases charged to their monthly bills.

At launch, skoob will claim a catalogue of over 39,000 local and international titles for smartphones, tablets and PCs. The carrier says this is the first e-book service to accept payments in Singapore dollars, and offers significant savings from retail dead-tree prices.

“The Singapore market has long been overlooked by e-book services from abroad. With the launch of skoob, Singapore readers finally have a service that offers local books and caters specifically to their tastes and needs. It also provides local publishers and writers with a powerful digital platform that allows them to reach a wider audience,” said Goh Seow Eng, SingTel’s Chief of Digital Home.

Publishers on board with the service include the "big six" internationals - Random House, Penguin, HarperCollins, Hachette Book Group, Simon and Schuster, and Macmillan.

“SingTel is transforming from a provider of traditional telecommunications services to a multimedia solutions provider. We are constantly developing new apps and services that make the most of our networks and smartphone technology to enhance the lives of our customers,” he added.

SingTel has yet to confirm whether the offer will be rolled out to its international subsidiaries including Optus. While taking the service overseas would be feasible, internationalisation would need a whole new round of copyright negotiations. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.