IT bods to prove their prowess in bed with spooks

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The British Computer Society has launched a pilot scheme to certify information assurance professionals in government.

The full scheme will be launched in January 2012 and will focus on developing and delivering an Information Assurance Specialist Certification Scheme for anyone working in a government department or those working on government contracts.

According to the BCS, the scheme will offer three levels of certification for practitioners, senior practitioners and lead practitioners. It will cover six information assurance roles identified by CESG: security and information risk advisor, security architect, accreditor, information assurance auditor, IT security officer, and communications security officer.

The contract to deliver the scheme was awarded to the BCS by CESG, the information assurance agency of GCHQ and the UK's national technical authority for information assurance.

David Clarke, chief executive officer at the BCS, said: "Having won the contract in September, we're now starting a pilot stage to ensure that our processes allow information assurance specialists to achieve the grade of certification they need to work on government projects."

He invited anyone interested in scheme to register their interest so they can receive information when it opens fully next year.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

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