Feeds

Ultrabooks are doomed unless prices tumble

A minimum 25 per cent cut required, says analyst

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Ultrabooks are likely to be a flop with hard-up shoppers until prices fall by at least 25 per cent, market watcher Gartner has warned.

Reports today from the Far East indicate that early adoption rates of the nascent platform have fallen below expectations: Acer and Asustek are reported to have slashed orders with their manufacturers.

According to DigiTimes, the PC vendors cut initial orders, believed to be between 250,000 and 300,000, to somewhere between 150,000 and 180,000 units.

Acer would not directly comment on the reports but said its corporate policy was to "limit any liability related to stock". This follows the inventory debacle that cost the vendor millions of pounds in profits this year and strained relationships with kit-laden channel partners that refused to take additional shipments.

Antonello Fornara, EMEA product director at Acer, told The Reg it was still "testing the waters to understand the real market size and potential" but added that adoption in the early stages may not be wide scale due to the 13in screen size and pricing.

"It is not the most effective screen size, in future development there will be 15in screen size. With these specs and price points the market will take a different volume," he said.

Gartner research director Ranjit Atwal forecast shipments to be "very small" in 2011 and modest in 2012, "unless pricing falls by a substantial level - 25 per cent at least".

"The big unknown is pricing and what Windows 8 will bring to the party. We are less than optimistic about [ultrabook sales in] 2012," he said.

Earlier this week, analyst iSuppli claimed high prices would limit adoption but forecast that with this addressed, sales would account for 43 per cent of overall notebook shipments by 2015.

An even more aggressive estimate was made by Intel UK boss Graham Palmer, who reckoned ultrabooks could make up 40 per cent of consumer notebooks by the end of next year.

"The first products just started to appear in UK retailers," he said, adding that as the market develops a wider range of choice and price points will materialise. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.