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Apple: No Siri for old iPhone owners. Well, not from us

What, don't you have £499? Well, boo hoo

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Siri will not be rolled out to the owners of older iPhone models a blogger has claimed.

The wonders and joys of the talkie virtual assistant software will only be available to those who shell out £499 for the newest model of the iPhone according to emails received from Apple engineers and posted on the blog of Michael Steeber.

A developer passed Steeber over an email exchange he'd had with Apple after suggesting that Apple include Siri as a paid upgrade option for owners of older models. Apple responded to the idea in typically terse style:

"Siri only works on iPhone 4S and we currently have no plans to support older devices."

Older handsets are perfectly capable of running the software, a version has been demoed on a jailbroken iPhone 4 and the Siri app used to run on the iPhone 3Gs before it was pulled off the iTunes store when the start-up was bought out by Apple.

So if you want that burbling web-powered assistant, go out and buy the new phone or get jail-breaking. ®

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