Feeds

Adobe confirms mobile Flash Player's race is run

HTML 5 is the future

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

It's official: Adobe Flash Player is dead for mobile browsers… almost.

Once Flash 11.1 for Android devices and RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook is done, Adobe will develop no future versions, it confirmed today, though it will patch bugs and plug security holes yet to be discovered in the 11.1 code.

Adobe said it views HTML 5 as the "best solution" for "creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms" now that the standard is "universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively".

Guess which one that is...

So where does that leave Flash? Not dead, seemingly. Adobe wants coders to produce Flash apps which can be then run through its Air system and spat out as native apps to be sold in stores' gaming and video departments.

And Flash will continue to be rolled out on less portable personal computers.

Quite apart from Apple's intransigence, Adobe's move was always a possibility. Developing Flash Player for ARM-based devices requires the code to be tweaked for each offering. That was a costly enough business when there were a handful of ARM-based smartphones. Now there are many - and plenty more ARM-based tablets besides.

The effort required to equip them all - well, almost all of them - with Flash Player is just too costly, especially if the vendors themselves won't cough up.

Ironically, this was a problem Intel once pitched its Atom chip as the solution. Based on the x86 standard, it's a more straightforward chip to develop for. Code Flash player for Atom and, say, Linux and that app will run on every Atom/Linux-based device - there's no need to re-certify it for each device.

Alas, Intel has not managed to get Atom power consumption levels down to those of ARM's chips. And HTML 5 has arrived as an alternative standard that can be supported without plenty of extra work to ensure it runs on any given smartphone or tablet. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Microsoft confirms secret Surface will never see the light of day
Microsoft's form 8-K records decision 'not to ship a new form factor'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.