Feeds

EU advisors: Tighter web privacy will stamp out bullies

Sensitive info leaking to tormentors and paedos – report

High performance access to file storage

Improved safeguards and greater resources for law enforcement are needed to tackle the related problems of cyber-bullying and online grooming, according to a report by an EU security agency published on Tuesday.

ENISA (the European Network and Information Security Agency) warned that the mishandling of personal information gathered using data-mining or profiling harms young people. It said private data exposed on the web might be subsequently seized upon and misused by bullies, online predators or crooks. This is obviously detrimental to anyone's well-being and the development of children's social skills.

Many parents lose control of their children's online environment as they lack the knowledge and tools to support their offspring, ENISA notes.

Prof Udo Helmbrecht, executive director of ENISA, commented: "Our children run the risk of becoming victims of online grooming and cyber-bullying; therefore actions are needed to protect teenagers’ cyber activities."

ENISA Expert Group on internet risks has come up with a list of 18 recommendations on how to tackle the twin problems of online bullying and grooming. The key recommendations include the need to strengthen law enforcement agencies in member states. Greater resources and manpower are needed to "properly cover regulatory issues, statistical data collection of misuse cases, and follow up on privacy breaches", the group said. How to pay for increased manpower and resources for police at a time of Europe-wide economic crisis is not tackled by the report, however.

The EU agency would also like to sponsored online campaigns to prevent grooming and cyber-torment on social networks. It would also like to see specialised security settings and user account profiles for teenagers to cover their particular needs, plus better privacy and age-related controls for applications that have access to teenagers.

In addition, ENISA would like to see improved efforts to educate parents about cyber-threats. The full report, including an assessment of risks and recommendations to different target audiences, can be found here. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn
Installing random interwebs shiz will bork your zombie box
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.