Feeds

Duke Nukem Forever dev slams unfair reviews

Panned game up there with Half-Life, apparently

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Developer Gearbox this week said Duke Nukem Forever was reviewed unfairly, with co-founder Brian Martel comparing the Duke's return to the classic Half-Life.

In an interview with Eurogamer at Gamescom in August - by which was published yesterday - Martel expressed confusion over the game's bad reception and insisted "everybody should really be thankful that it existed to some degree at all."

Duke Nukem Forever

According to Martel, modern gamers aren't used to adventures in the style of DNF, claiming the game "was what it was meant to be, which is a more old-school style game [using] today's technology".

He then went on to make the comparison to Valve's much-loved FPS epic.

"Would Half-Life today be reviewed as highly as it was?" Martel wonders.

"I think we all have a nostalgia and love for that particular brand. Obviously, Gearbox got its start working on Opposing Force so we love Half-Life. But would the current gamer have the same love for [it]? I think the same kind of thing happened with Duke," he said.

It isn't the first time Gearbox has made the comparison. Prior to DNF's release, top dog Randy Pitchford declared readers would lament any journalist's bad reviews, because "the last time I had a really solid experience like this was Half-Life 2".

The long awaited - and heavily hyped - Duke Nukem Forever landed on shelves in June and was immediately slated by reviewers right across the board.

Some were subsequently threatened by flacks that they'd be blacklisted for negative insights, although that particular PR team soon lost the Gearbox account.

Duke Nukem Forever

Despite disagreeing with the criticism, Martel did reveal it would be "taken into account". And he guaranteed it wouldn't take another 15 years to see another Duke game.

So there you have it, we will be seeing more of the Duke sometime in the future. Let's just hope it won't be another 'Fail to the King'.

You can read what we thought about Duke Nukem Forever here on Reg Hardware. As you can probably guess, we didn't think it was that great, either. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.