Feeds

Facebook denies silent stalking of punters (again)

Hamburg watchdog pokes 'suspicious' cookies

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Facebook has once again been forced to defend its use of cookies after a German watchdog said it was "suspicious" that the dominant social network was creating tracking profiles of its users without seeking their consent to do so.

The company denied it was slurping such data from its stalkerbase as claimed by the Hamburg data protection authority (DPA).

"Facebook does not track users across the web," it said in a statement. "Instead, we use cookies on social plugins to personalise content (e.g. Show you what your friends liked), to help maintain and improve what we do (e.g. Measure click-through rate), or for safety and security (e.g. Keeping underage kids from trying to signup with a different age).

"No information we receive when you see a social plugins is used to target ads, we delete or anonymise this information within 90 days, and we never sell your information."

On the thorny topic of logged-out cookies, Facebook said it deleted the files when a user signed out of the site.

"We do not receive personally identifiable cookie information when logged-out users browse the web," the firm said.

The Hamburg DPA has previously warned Facebook that it would be fined by the watchdog if the company failed to delete the "biometric data" it harvested from its facial recognition tech.

The Register understands that Facebook has offered to provide the DPA with a technical explanation of how it uses cookies. For its part, the company considers any conclusion reached by the Hamburg watchdog before proper consultation with Facebook to be "incomplete". ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Google Nest, ARM, Samsung pull out Thread to strangle ZigBee
But there's a flaw in Google's IP-based IoT system
Orange spent weekend spamming customers with TXTs
Zero, not infinity, is the Magic Number customers want
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
NBN Co execs: No FTTN product until 2015
Faster? Not yet. Cheaper? No data
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.