Feeds

Hague refuses to name nations which cyberattack Britain

'Vigorous private discussions' shall be theirs, though

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

LCC The London Conference on Cyberspace wasn't a forum for outing the states that had launched cyberattacks in the UK, the Foreign Secretary said yesterday.

One of William Hague's "messages" from the conference, outlined in his closing remarks, was that "state-sponsored attacks are not in the interests of any country long-term, and those governments that perpetrate them need to bring them under control".

The statement was rather weak when compared with the Prime Minister's promise in his speech on Monday that the UK would respond "robustly" to any cyberattack.

When challenged on why Britain hasn't done more about the state-sponsored attacks that have already happened, Hague told reporters that they were going about this issue in a diplomatic way.

"We have not been having a judgemental conference. I don't think you can simultaneously hold a conference of this kind, drawing governments into the discussion and then doing the equivalent of pointing the finger at them all saying 'You are guilty men'," he said.

He also said that people made a lot of assumptions about who was behind state attacks and they weren't always right.

However he added that he expected the government would have "vigorous and private discussions about these things" in the future.

The conference has also come under some criticism for apparently stirring the brewing trouble between Western countries and China and Russia over the issue of internet regulations.

William Hague acknowledged that the UK and US message from the conference that the internet shouldn't be subject to strong state control was in some conflict with China and Russia's call for a code of conduct online, but said he hadn't expected to solve that conflict in the last two days.

"There's a difference between Britain, the US and European societies on the one hand and China and Russia, of course. There's different attitudes to freedom of expression, offline as well as online," he told reporters, adding that he didn't expect to "square" those differences right now.

However, he reiterated the British government's stance that there should be freedom of expression and openness online and said states that hoped to curb their citizens on the web were likely to be disappointed.

"In the long term, efforts to resist the free flow of information, the tide that's going towards greater transparency and accountability, will fail," he said.

A statement on the findings of the conference can be found here. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.