Feeds

Biden: The internet ain't broke, let's not fix it

US rejects calls for 'national barriers on information'

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

LCC US Vice President Joe Biden has made it clear that America is not interested in the sort of global internet rules that China and Russia have been calling for.

China, Russia, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan proposed a voluntary "code of conduct" for information security to the UN in September.

Countries following the code would have “respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms and respect for the diversity of history, culture and social systems of all countries”, and promise “not to use information and communications technologies, including networks, to carry out hostile activities or acts of aggression, pose threats to international peace and security or proliferate information weapons or related technologies”.

But they would have to curb “the dissemination of information that incites terrorism, secessionism or extremism or that undermines other countries’ political, economic and social stability, as well as their spiritual and cultural environment” as part of the pact.

The US has shown before that it’s reluctant to sign any sort of restrictive internet treaty and Biden, speaking at the London Conference on Cyberspace (LCC), agreed with remarks by UK Foreign Secretary William Hague and Prime Minister David Cameron that the internet needed to stay free and open and out from under heavy government control.

“There are some who have a different view, as you know. They seek an international legal instrument that would lead to exclusive government control over Internet resources, institutions, and content, and national barriers on the free flow of information online,” Biden said.

“But this, in our view, would lead to a fragmented internet, one that does not connect people but divides them, a stagnant cyberspace, not an innovative one, and ultimately a less secure cyberspace with less trust among nations.”

He added that existing international law principles existed in cyberspace as well as the real world, so there was no need for additional regulation, a view he summarized in one of his favourite adages – if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

The vice president addressed the conference over a video link from Washington, after a planned visit from US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was cancelled when her mother fell ill. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.