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Blogger freaks after airport lackey fondles checked-in vibrator

TSA forced to perform 'removal action' on employee

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Air travellers in the US can rest easy that they can happily pack sex toys in their luggage after the Transportation Safety Administration began a "removal" action on an errant employee.

The TSA found itself impaled on the horns of a dilemma last week when Jill Filipovic, a New York-based lawyer and blogger, revealed that a TSA screener had left a hand-written note attached to the vibrator she had slipped into her checked baggage.

The scrawl, on the standard note left in bags that have been screened, read "get your freak on girl".

Rather than simply freaking, Filipovic posted the note onto Twitter, prompting a frenzy of tweets about "vibration of privacy" along with warnings never to use the device again.

For its part, the TSA's inhouse "Blogger Bob" announced an investigation into the "highly inappropriate note" which quickly identified the smirking individual responsible.

Bob reassured readers that they can safely pack their silver bullets and rampant rabbits in their checked luggage, saying "The handwritten note was highly inappropriate and unprofessional, and TSA has zero tolerance for this type of behavior."

Intriguingly, Bob added that "Agency officials have also reached out to the passenger to personally apologize for this unfortunate incident."

In a postscript he added that the investigation was now complete, and the TSA "has initiated action to remove the individual from federal service".

The employee was entitled to due process, but "[p]ending the completion of the removal action, the employee will not perform any screening duties".

But the guardians of public safety have used the opportunity, and no doubt rush of readers to its blog, to warn that it still takes a dim view of passengers who try to sneak shooters and shanks onto planes hidden in their nuts.

On a post on Friday, Bob detailed the week's haul of loaded weapons from passengers' hand luggage, including seven loaded pistols on the 25th alone. One passenger apparently tried to slip in a knife by secreting it in their nuts. Peanuts that is. ®

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