Feeds

LightSquared pulls out all the stops to get FCC approval

Financial shenanigans, conflicts of interest and a technical solution?

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

LightSquared is fighting with every weapon at its disposal to win the war of public perception, and get FCC approval for its controversial network before the cash runs out.

The wannabe-network operator reckons it has solved the GPS-interference problem, but the battle is now political. So it's accusing a prime government advisor of having a financial interest in seeing LightSquared fail, while also pointing out that directors of GPS-developer Trimble dumped millions of shares following the FCC's last ruling in LightSquared's favour.

The technical solution involves using new GPS kit from Javad GNSS, which is already being tested. LightSquared has also announced new filters costing as little as $6, and a new antenna which was originally described as something which could be retrofitted to existing GPS devices, but later turned into a designed-in feature.

Estimates vary, but there are something in the region of half a million high-precision GPS receivers, which will be knocked out if LightSquared is allowed to build its proposed LTE network in the radio frequencies previously reserved for satellite communications. Even if better filters, and/or antennas, can be retrofitted, there is still the question of who is going to pay for them.

LightSquared contends that it is up to GPS receivers to ignore its signals, and that kit conforming to the GPS standard shouldn't pick them up anyway. The GPS crowd reckons it's too late for that, with billions of devices already being used daily they want neighbouring frequencies kept quiet.

LightSquared had been rushing around telling anyone who'll listen that Bradford Parkinson, vice chairman of the "Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Advisory" – which provides federal advice on GPS matters – is also a director of, and shareholder in, Trimble. Trimble makes GPS kit, and stands to lose a great deal of money if it is forced to supply replacements to GPS users, or charge more for its products.

"It seems highly incongruous and even inappropriate to us that the government's top outside adviser on GPS matters would be simultaneously helping to oversee the same company that is leading the public-relations and lobbying campaign against LightSquared, and that has a financial interest in the outcome of that battle," said a statement from LightSquared, which also highlighted how Trimble directors sold shares directly after the FCC's first ruling in LightSquared's favour:

The trading was "three times the highest amount of stock board members and top managers had unloaded in any one month going back to 2007," says the LightSquared release, as reported by the National Journal, continuing: "This demonstrates that Trimble insiders clearly viewed LightSquared as a financial threat to its commercial business."

The fact that Parkinson is a director of Trimble shouldn't be any great surprise: the chap more-or-less invented GPS and his directorship is on his Wikipedia page, so it's hardly a state secret.

But the revelations are more indicative of how LightSquared is gearing up for a political battle, as well as a technical one. The National Journal also reports that the company has been busy recruiting lobbyists, while the fact that the company regularly makes the pages of Politico shows the direction the debate is taking.

Meanwhile the FCC engineers are testing the technical solutions, with a view to a public decision on the viability of the operator by the end of 2011. Until that ruling LightSquared can't raise any more cash, and is now hinting at legal action to force the regulator's hand, but if it's going to be successful, the company will need to solve the political problems as well as the technical ones. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.