Feeds

BBC iPlayer to require TV licence

The cost of catch-up

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Watching BBC iPlayer may soon be illegal if you do not possess a TV licence if proposals under consideration by the government become law.

As it stands, any UK resident viewing a live broadcast - be that on their TV, games console, mobile phone or fondleslab - must pay the annual licence fee of £145.50.

But it is not necessary to pay the UK's enforced annual BBC subscription if you just watch catch-up TV.

Past BBC research found that only 0.2 per cent of households use iPlayer and other catch-up services as their only source of telly content.

However, with heaps of internet-enabled set-top boxes ready to flood the market over the coming year, observers reckon many more people will start watching telly through catch-up services rather than as live broadcasts.

That is prompting the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to consider changing the law, The Guardian claims.

"Government is aware of developing technologies and the changing viewing habits of those who watch television programmes," the ministry told the paper. "How the BBC is funded as these issues evolve is a matter the department will need to address in the near future."

Culture secretary Jeremy Hunt last year insisted the government wouldn't introduce a 'PC licence' fee.

A green paper on a new communications bill is expected this December. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Dragon Age Inquisition: Our chief weapons are...
Bioware's fantasy forces in fine fettle
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.