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Samsung gets fast-track appeal on Tab injunction

Aussie court gives firm expedited hearing on Apple's fondleslab ban

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Samsung Electronics has won court approval to fast-track its appeal against the ban on its Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia.

The Korean company didn't look like it was going to catch a break in its ongoing patent battles with Apple after the last few decisions went against it, but it has been granted an expedited hearing by the Federal Court in Sydney, according to a Reuters report.

The firm will be hoping to overturn the ban on its new Galaxy fondleslab before the lucrative Christmas shopping period really kicks off.

"I'm quite firm of the view that the matter should proceed on the basis that the lead application be referred to a full court, that it be listed at the same time as any prospective appeal and that the matter be expedited," Justice Lindsay Foster said, although no date has yet been set.

The two companies were also in the courts for preliminary hearings into Samsung's attempt to get the new Jesus-mobe banned on the basis that it infringes on Samsung's patents.

The Korean chaebol launched preliminary injunction motions in a number of countries – including Australia, Japan and France – before the iPhone 4S even hit the shelves.

The move was the latest in the Great Patent Wars between Apple and the manufacturers using Google's Android OS, which has been taking place all over the world and is becoming more and more heated.

Samsung has been willing to modify its products to get through the court cases, doing so in Netherlands on its smartphones and in Australia with the Tab 10.1 as well, although in the end the changes weren't enough for Apple to settle the suit.

Last week, Samsung launched its latest phone, the Galaxy Nexus, which mobile president JK Shin said should avoid Apple patents.

"We will see if [the Nexus] will be 100 per cent free from Apple lawsuits,” Shin told reporters in Hong Kong, adding that the patent wars between the two companies were only beginning. ®

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