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Samsung, Google whip out Android 4.0 Nexus

Ice Cream Sarnie smartphone launched

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Here's the Samsung Galaxy Nexus - aka the Galaxy Prime - launched by the South Korean Apple biter and Google in Hong Kong this morning.

As expected, it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich on a 1.2GHz dual-core processor and a 4.7in, 1280 x 720 OLED display. There's a gigabyte of Ram on board, and a choice of 16GB or 32Gb of Flash storage.

Samsung Google Galaxy Nexus Android 4.0 smartphone

There's no Micro SD expansion by the look of it, but that has yet to be confirmed by Samsung.

The 135g smartphone is 9mm thick, but packs in a choice of LTE or 21Mb/s download, 5.8Mb/s upload HSPA+ connectivity. It has quad-band GSM/Edge for back-up.

You've got 2.4GHz 802.11n Wi-Fi too, and the handset has NFC for touch-to-pay services.

Samsung Google Galaxy Nexus Android 4.0 smartphone

There's a 5Mp autofocus camera on the back, and a 1.3Mp webcam on the front.

The Galaxy Nexus goes on sales worldwide early next month. Pricing has yet to be set.

Vodafone, Three and O2 have each said they will be offering the handset when it's released in the UK. ®

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