Feeds

Currys, PC World websites slated by punters

Customers irate over price, delivery and usability

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Dixons Group's websites for Currys and PC World are among the worst online shops for electrical appliances, according to a new study by consumer rights group Which?

Out of the 25 sites listed by the research, Currys and PC World came joint 22nd, with only Asda and B&Q rated worse as places to buy electronics online.

The poor placing is par for the course for Currys, as it came 18th out of 20 sites listed last year.

Customers were happy enough with the stock at the two Dixons Group sites, but they lost out on price, delivery and website usability.

A Dixons Retail spokesperson told The Register: "We are disappointed to be so low on the list as we aim to provide a good service to our customers, but we recognise that there are areas we can develop and are currently working to improve a number of aspects of our websites."

The best place to buy electrics online is still John Lewis, the top site in that category for the last three years and also the second best place to shop for anything online, according to the poll.

The Which? respondents that rated John Lewis said its website was easy to use and had good stock. They also appreciated the store's after-sales service.

"I reported an item faulty after a few months of use and John Lewis apologised and replaced it without argument," one respondent told Which? "I've bought other electrical products there in the past with the same problem-free experience."

Amazon was next in line for the top online electronics shop, followed by Richer Sounds, 7 Day Shop and Apple. Unsurprisingly, Apple was given the thumbs-up on stock, delivery and usability, but received the lowest mark for price of any the top five.

The best overall online shop for goods was Liz Earle, followed as mentioned by John Lewis, with Amazon next and fourth place a tie between Abe Books and Lakeland.

The 14,671 respondents to the poll told Which? the main reason they shopped online was that "it's cheaper and easier to compare prices".

Price was the deciding factor in where to buy for most people, with a third of folks giving it as their top priority. All the coverage around security is also sinking in with consumers, as a "secure website" was voted by 29 per cent as the main issue.

Delivery issues were a major irritation for all of the respondents. Around 40 per cent of shoppers found paying a high price, or indeed any price, for postage and packing annoying, while 38 per cent of respondents get aggro over not being able to choose a specific or suitable delivery time. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Lords take revenge on REVENGE PORN publishers
Jilted Johns and Jennies with busy fingers face two years inside
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Yes, yes, Steve Jobs. Look what I'VE done for you lately – Tim Cook
New iPhone biz baron points to Apple's (his) greatest successes
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.