Feeds

Hundreds of Mr A N OTHERs discovered on payrolls

Don't take it personally... your bosses aren't

The Power of One Infographic

If you take a look at employers' PAYE paperwork, the UK's most popular surnames are getting a run for their money - by an army of Mr Unknowns and Mrs Dummys.

According to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC), employers frequently send in PAYE forms with the wrong data on them, leading to incorrect amounts of tax being taken from their workers.

Common mistakes in the data were incorrect surnames, most of which seem to have originated as placeholders when an administrator did not have the correct information to hand.

Around 820 people in the tax year 2009/10 had the surname Unknown, while 500 people were labelled A N Other, 128 staff members were called Mr/Mrs Dummy, and 572 employees were branded with family names ranging from X to XXXXXX.

The 100 or so staff members that were named according to their job title may have been a result of their employer having misread the form, with 75 people called Casual, 11 Cleaners, nine Workers and six Students.

There were also 40 people who were either vampires, gods or the victims of a typo, since they were apparently at least 200 years old.

The taxman released the information in a bid to get companies to be a bit more careful about how they fill in the paperwork.

"We really want employers to check that they are sending us the right details for all their employees, to make life easier for them, HMRC and their employees," Jim Harra, director of customer operations at HMRC, said in a canned statement.

"Around 80 per cent of errors in employee data are due to an incorrect name, date of birth or national insurance number – straightforward information that can be collected and checked quite easily," he added. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.