Feeds

Sony network ransacked in huge brute-force attack

93,000 accounts broken into

The essential guide to IT transformation

Sony has warned users against a massive bruteforce attack against PlayStation and Sony network accounts.

The attack – which used password and user ID combinations from an unidentified third-party source – succeeded in compromising 60,000 PlayStation Network and 33,000 Sony Online Entertainment network accounts. These accounts have been locked and passwords reset.

Credit card information is not stored on the dashboard of Sony accounts but it might have been possible that unauthorised charges were made against the wallets held on compromised accounts. Sony has promised to refund any such losses, as explained in a statement by Philip Reitinger, senior vice president and chief information security officer at Sony Group, on the PlayStation blog here.

Both the motive for the latest attack against Sony network users and the identity of the perpetrator(s) remains unclear.

Sony shut down its PlayStation Network in April in the aftermath of a far more damaging hack attack. The service wasn't restored until a month later. Personal information on 77 million account-holders was exposed as a result of the April PlayStation hack. Details including names, addresses, passwords and purchase histories was exposed by the megahack.

Sony was widely criticised for its handling of the incident, one of the biggest data breach incident (by volume of records) in history. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.