Feeds

Intel turns its back on the small screen

Will design chips for computers, not TVs

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Intel will no longer try to get its system-on-a-chip products inside TVs having largely failed to persuade telly makers to do so.

A company spokeswoman told Bloomberg that the designers and engineers working on Intel's CE chippery will shift their focus to products for computers, tablets and phones.

Intel has been trying to win over TV manufacturers for the best part of five years. It's first real consumer electronics-oriented SoC, the CE2110, launched in April 2007, but it had been evangelising the product category before then.

The CE2110 was one of Intel's last ARM-based parts. The following year, in Sepetmber 2008, Intel shifted the line to its own x86 architecture with the CE3110, an SoC that was superseded in September 2009 by the CE4100, Intel's first CE-centric part based on its Atom processor.

Intel promotes Atom SoCs for CE apps

No longer

It had high hopes for the part. The CE2110 and CE3110 were essentially foot-in-the-door products - it was the CE4100 that was going to really get the company into tellies and set-top boxes.

At launch, Intel CEO Paul Otellini told journalists that the chip giant would be selling more SoCs than mainstream CPUs by 2014.

That goal looks a lot less certain now - Intel makes SoCs for other applications than CE kit. The only name customers it has had are US cable company Comcast, which picked the CE line for a set-top box, and Sony and Logitech, which used the CE4100 in their Google TV products - a service that has singularly failed to set the TV world alight.

Yet, TV makers have never been keener to promote the concept of the "Smart TV" - a telly with internet connectivity and the ability to run apps linked to a range of social networking and IPTV services.

So there's demand there for smart TV-oriented chips. If Intel no longer believes it can satisfy that craving, it either couldn't match its competitors on price - or its Atom chippery justisn't up to snuff. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Dragon Age Inquisition: Our chief weapons are...
Bioware's fantasy forces in fine fettle
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.