Feeds

Google loses battle for goggle.com

Typosquatter's rights upheld – for now

Business security measures using SSL

Google has lost its cybersquatting fight with typo-snaffle site goggle.com, enabling its owner to carry on enticing clumsy typists into signing up for pricey text messaging services.

The company's complaint against the domain name's current registrant, Barbados-based David Csumrik, was dismissed on procedural grounds yesterday by a three-person National Arbitration Forum panel in the US.

Right now, Goggle.com's website asks visitors a short series of questions before attempting to persuade them to sign up for a £3-per-text quiz competition, offering the latest Apple products as prizes.

Screenshot of goggle.com

This isn't the search engine you were looking for

This is the preferred money-making scheme today for typo-targeting domains of high-traffic websites. Twitter filed a similar complaint over the domain name twiter.com in June.

Google attempted to slay goggle.com by wielding the Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy, which was designed to give trademark owners a way to take domains from cybersquatters without resorting to expensive litigation.

While goggle.com appears primarily to take advantage of butterfingered web searchers, the NAF panel declined to consider the UDRP's standard tests of "confusing similarity" or "bad faith registration".

Csumrik, in his response to Google's complaint, showed paperwork claiming that Google and the disputed domain's previous owner, Knowledge Associates, had legally agreed to "co-exist".

Those rights transferred to him when he bought the domain, he claimed.

This was enough to convince the NAF panel that the dispute was "outside the scope" of the narrowly focused UDRP, which does not deal with contractual or business disputes.

"Does the Co-existence Agreement apply to the disputed domain names? Does Respondent stand in the shoes of the original registrant? Does the consent of Complainant extend in time to the current actions of Respondent and in person to the Respondent? Has the Respondent complied with the obligations of the original registrant?" the panel asked. "These are factual and legal issues that go far beyond the scope of the Policy."

While the decision is good news for goggle.com's owner, it may be too early to break out the champagne – if Google is determined to get hold of the domain, it may now resort to expensive court action. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.