Feeds

The effects of Consumerisation results

The readers speak

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Reg Research The results of our mega-survey on consumerisation are in. It was a big sucker, and all those who completed it should be congratulated for their stamina and commitment. And your efforts really are appreciated, because we learned a lot.

In the first part of the survey, we asked readers to tell us about their own use of personal equipment and personal internet service accounts at work, starting out by looking at the mix of devices they own (Figure 1).

As we can see, Windows dominates the personal desktop and notebook space, though we see a good showing of Mac notebooks, with Linux (which made up most of the ‘Other’ category) putting in a reasonable appearance too.

Having said this, we need to be careful not to take the figures on face value – we know from experience that Mac and Linux users have more of a tendency to complete online surveys to do with end user computing than Windows users because they are keener to promote their chosen platform. Non-Windows users are therefore almost certainly over-represented. The same also goes for gadgets in general in that tablet and smartphone users like to talk about their kit. We would be surprised, for example, if 1 in 5 Reg readers owned an iPad, which the data would suggest if you took it literally.

But the bias doesn’t stop us extracting some valuable insights, like those we get when we look at the proportion of users of each type of device employing their personal equipment for work purposes (Figure 2).

There are a couple of important observations we can make from this chart. Firstly, while there is some variation, it would be incorrect to assume that this aspect of consumerisation, i.e. the use of personal devices for work, is associated with particular kit. If you have a personal MacBook, for example, you are only marginally more likely to want to use it for work than owners of Windows notebooks. The same goes for iPhones versus Android smartphones and the various kinds of tablet devices. According to this data, at least, the often heard assumption that Apple is driving the consumerisation of IT would seem not to be true.

The other important observation is that the number of readers who say they would like to use their device but are not permitted to is relatively small. The question of policy in this area and how well it is enforced is an interesting one, and we cover this in more detail in the full study report.

In the meantime, the other aspect of consumerisation we looked at was the use of personal accounts for public internet services (Figure 3).

This chart tells us is that there appears to be a lot more logging into personal accounts at work for personal activity (second column) than using those accounts for work purposes (third column). The stories we hear about youngsters driving a wholesale change in corporate behaviour would therefore appear to be somewhat exaggerated. Indeed, when we break the results out by age, it’s clear that Generation Y is not, on the whole, coming into the organisation, refusing to use clunky old systems, then using Facebook and other familiar services to get their jobs done. They might be more inclined to flout rules about doing personal stuff on company time, but sneaking a quick look at your personal email or social media account is something quite a few people are guilty of in all age groups (Figure 4).

Of course everything we have been looking at here relates to readers’ own use of personal technology and services for work. In the second part of our mega-survey, we asked those who participated to tell us what is going on across their organisation’s workforce as a whole.

To see the findings, including an analysis of whether consumerisation really does lead to the frequently claimed productivity benefits, you’ll have to download the full report right here.

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.