Feeds

'Silent majority' is content with elderly Java, says startup

Prise version 6 from cold dead hands

High performance access to file storage

Oracle might be looking at Java 7 and 8 to float clouds, but tech vendors are only just adopting Java 6 as a serious prop for web-based computing.

Platform-as-a-service startup CloudBees has become the latest Java supporter to embrace a part of the Java Enterprise Edition 6 spec from two years ago for web development.

CloudBees this week announced it is adding full support for development and deployment of Java EE Web Profile.

The Web Profile was introduced with Java EE in December 2009 to make programming Java apps for web easier by delivering a kind of template that stripped out superfluous EE features.

You can see the Web Profile's contents here.

The Web Profile was devised as an answer to those who believed, rightly, that Java EE had become a bloated and monolithic programming stack. Others had already tackled this, most notably Spring Source's Spring Framework – Spring Source is now owned by VMWare.

CloudBees isn't the only one spinning up the industry's commitment to Java EE 6.

IBM delivered its WebSphere Application Server 8 in June with Web Profile included in its support for Java EE 6. Resin, the Java application server from Caucho Technology, is also certified as compliant with Java EE 6 Web Profile.

WebSphere and Resin follow Red Hat's JBoss 6.0 application server, which was released in December 2010 with support for the Web Profile spec, and GlassFish 3.0.1, Oracle's offering in June 2010.

It is not unusual these days for Java vendors to lag behind the latest version of Java when it comes to certification, although it wasn't always thus. In the white-hot days of Java 2 Enterprise Edition 1.3, who could certify first was a serious business, as the middleware makers were in land grab for customers.

Oracle's chief executive Larry Ellison publicly bet his database giant could beat smaller BEA Systems to J2EE 1.3 certification during his June 2001 JavaOne keynote, but it was BEA who came first. Oracle was the ultimate victor, buying BEA and snuffing out one of its toughest rivals.

The number of suppliers may have contracted and developer tastes changed in favor of smaller, more modular containers, but companies clearly think there's a large number of enterprise Java customers out there ready for web programming based on the Web Profile.

These include CloudBees. You can now use Web Profile's developer PaaS to work with application servers other than Tomcat, based on the Java EE 6 spec.

Sacha Labourey, CloudBees chief executive and founder, told us Java EE has taken a bashing for being big, sometimes with good reason. But: "There's a big silent majority working with Java EE and using application servers. If you listened to the hype, everybody would be doing Ruby on Rails and Spring." ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
IRS boss on XP migration: 'Classic fix the airplane while you're flying it attempt'
Plus: Condoleezza Rice at Dropbox 'maybe she can find ... weapons of mass destruction'
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.