Feeds

BT hauls Digital Economy Act back to court

Last chance for telco to slay the beast

Boost IT visibility and business value

The Court of Appeal has today granted BT permission to appeal against the High Court’s judicial review of the Digital Economy Act. BT had attempted to get sections of the Act repealed in the High Court, but saw most of its arguments thrown out in April. It won a minor point on costs, but the five cornerstones of its argument were rejected.

In May, BT and co-litigator TalkTalk said they would appeal, but this was rejected in June. The Pirate Party, and taxpayer-funded quango Consumer Focus, which is due to be abolished, are also petitioning for a review.

The High Court judge, Mr Justice Kenneth Parker, was particularly damning about the ISPs' challenge, repeatedly indicating that the DEA had not said what the ISPs thought it said. He also pointed out the new Act was fairer than the status quo, pointing to “the tyranny of small decisions that have ruinous economic consequences”.

The appeals stage will be an even higher hurdle for the ISPs, which must now argue that Parker didn’t understand the law. However, he appears to have understood it rather better than the anti-copyright activists.

In July Culture Minister Ed Vaizey had a pop at "the apologists for infringement, those who assert that copyright itself is an outmoded conspiracy, designed to put money into the pockets of corporations at the expense of ordinary people and so called 'real artists'," adding, "Supposedly you can’t be a real artist and make real money."

It used to be dinosaur music companies who preferred expensive litigation to business innovation. Now it’s dinosaur telcos. BT has spent vast sums on fighting the DEA, and its right to defend Newsbinz2, but has yet to launch a music service of its own.

BT's Simon Milner promised us it was working on one in an interview with El Reg in July. This was news to the entire UK music industry.

When we enquired more recently about how it was coming along, nobody at BT knew anything about it. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?