Feeds

Survey: Most TV viewers surf while they watch

Bad news for ad-slingers: 75% are scanning two screens

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A shade under three-quarters of TV viewers with broadband are surfing the web while they watch, with 38 per cent of them discussing what they're watching on social media.

The figures come from Ovum, and are based on 8,000 survey respondents across eight countries. They show that more than half of TV viewers are checking details online while they watch, and the proportion discussing TV shows rises to 53 per cent if only the 16 to 23-year-old demographic is included.

We say "discussing", though it seems most of the TV-related action on social media is more by way of "comment", as "discussion" would indicate a bidirectional exchange of ideas which isn't much in evidence in our (admittedly limited) experience.

The growth of "second screen" media is undeniable, with laptops and tablets becoming part of the living-room furniture these days. Whether viewers are expounding their opinions on the X Factor acts, or checking to see what else that bit-part actor was in, the important thing (to Ovum and its customers) is that viewers aren't watching the adverts like they used to.

It also means is that television shows have to become steadily more repetitive to appeal to an audience whose attention is largely elsewhere, which in turn drives that audience to its second screen even more as the plot is again reiterated, again, for those who missed it last time around. Thus television inevitably tailspins into marginalisation and advertisers have to catch eyeballs elsewhere.

The solution, according to Ovum, is for television shows to create their own social networking environments, rather than letting Twitter or Facebook take the advertising revenue from viewers drawn to the second screen.

Those of us who still prefer to watch one screen at a time will just have to take solace that those multi-taskers will never get the hang of Inception, while accepting that we're dinosaurs who the advertisers probably aren't interested in anyway. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.