Feeds

Sony Ericsson: 'We dropped the ball on iPhone'

No, really? Good god

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Sony Ericsson's CEO has admitted the company should have cottoned on earlier to the iPhone's success, though as he wasn't in the chair at the time it's not his fault.

Talking to the Wall Street Journal, current CEO Bert Nordberg admits the company should have taken the iPhone more seriously back in 2007, although the same could be said for just about every other phone manufacturer. More interestingly he confirms SE's decision to stick with Android and defends the company's plummeting market share.

Sony Ericsson didn't make money last year, but reckons that it would have done if the Japanese earthquake hadn't hit so hard, despite the fact that the company's share of the mobile handset industry has been falling fast.

That's not a problem, according to Nordberg, as the retraction is from the feature phone space where SE doesn't want to play any more anyway. "We have given up the feature-phone business and are not comparable to the large players like Nokia anymore," he told the WSJ during the interview.

SE was, at one point, in the frame to buy Motorola's handset division, which eventually got subsumed into Google, and when questioned about that the CEO explained that SE just didn't have the cash to get involved in an acquisition of that size.

Which is a shame as Motorola has a surprisingly enduring hold on the US market, while SE can't seem to make much progress. "We have underestimated how fast we would be able to penetrate the US market. We are a very tiny player in the US," admits the CEO, explaining that more deals with operators and a broader portfolio are in the works to address that.

But that portfolio will remain Android-based, as even Windows Phone isn't up to the mark according to SE's CEO: "I wouldn't feel comfortable investing in a platform that isn't as good as the one that we currently use". So Windows Phone is on the radar but not something worth moving towards just yet.

Sony Ericsson's Android strategy is serving it well, and it has some nice handsets coming out, but it needs to turn a profit next year to demonstrate that it was just the earthquake that knocked it back this time around. Missing the iPhone is something just about every company did, and nothing worth beating up your predecessor over. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.