Feeds

Americans offered sleep-monitoring datatouch card

What next? NFC incontinence pants?

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

T-Mobile USA is pushing out SleepTrak, a card which accumulates data on the user's sleeping habits and uploads it to a Nokia C7 for analysis.

The card has been around for a few months, but the company told NFC Times it has only sold a few hundred units prior to the new endorsement from the carrier which reckons hypochondriac insomniacs might be the ideal buyers of Nokia's lacklustre C7 handset.

The customer just slips the SleepTrak card into an arm-pouch and settles down to rest, the accelerometer in the card gathers data on throughout the night and uploads it when touched to a compatible handset, as shown in the manufacturer's demonstration video:

Aside from reporting how many times the user woke up (surely redundant at some level) the software monitors how disrupted the night's sleep was and provides a questionnaire for the user to establish a sleep diary, so they can try to identify what's stopping them getting a good night's rest.

It's part of the trend towards "wellness" applications, which we keep being told are the next big thing and are an area where NFC is expected to make great inroads.

Basically most of those involved in the mobile industry are getting pretty old these days, and increasingly paranoid about health, so there's an increasing focus on creating mobile applications which might help them live a little longer. It used to be connected jogging shoes, now its aids to sleeping, we're expecting connected incontinence pants any day now.

For T-Mobile this might be a way to shift some of those Nokia C7's which are cluttering up the place. The C7 is branded Astound in the USA but has not been flying off the shelves despite bring one of Nokia's first production handsets featuring Near Field Communications capability. Other vendors are using NFC to pay for stuff, or store loyalty cards, but Nokia's implementation lacks the secure element necessary for such applications so the company is keen to promote alternative uses of NFC.

Which apparently includes helping people sleep, unlock new levels on Angry Birds and connect up (Nokia) speakers - clearly all impossible without the very latest radio tech. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms
Readers chat to the pair who flog the tech
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?