Feeds

GridIron fires up its turbocharged bandwagon

That's the Big Data one - just happened to be passing

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

OpenWorld GridIron says its way of turbo-charging SAN access means more database instances can be virtualised and run faster - like, say, 16 virtualised Oracle RAC nodes in a physical server juggling one million queries a second.

The big idea is to accelerate big data access by using a TurboCharger data acceleration appliance sitting in-line in front of a storage area network (SAN). Big data here simply means a multi-terabyte database and applies to any app or app set that needs to get data out of a SAN as fast as possible; it's not limited to scientific big data or cloudy data; big data is just a convenient bandwagon to fit the TurboCharger appliance to.

Start-up GridIron says its magic is based on "set ranking" technology, a combination of software and silicon, to boost application speeds by up to a factor of 10 through faster data access.

Inside, it's a DRAM and solid-state storage cache with software to load it with appropriate data. You plug it in, fire it up, and about an hour later apps start going faster, if all goes to plan.

ESG has looked at it and blessed it: Mark Peters, a senior ESG analyst, said: "With the TurboCharger, GridIron has figured out how to identify exactly what data will be needed to match the throughput capabilities of the CPU and memory so that it can be staged to DRAM or flash in the appliance and thus eliminate most or all of the I/O gap caused by traditional storage bottlenecks."

This looks to be, roughly, the SAN equivalent of Cache IQ or Avere's FXT filer acceleration appliance, but with only two tiers of storage caching instead of the several that the FXT box uses.

It looks solid. There are GridIron customers in the retail, financial services, education, research, health care, media, telecommunications and government sectors. There are plenty of "Gee whiz, it worked and how" quotes too.

For example, Dave Zavatson, data centre manager at University of California, gushed: “GridIron’s TurboCharger helped the university improve the peak Oracle read performance in a VMware virtualized environment by up to 30x, reduced data centre costs by over $400,000, and extended the life of our existing storage infrastructure.”

That's the key, GridIron says, buy our kit to save money by boosting performance without buying a socking great big storage array - big performance without a big data SAN array. You can see the thing in action at Oracle OpenWorld. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.