Feeds

Better Business Bureau offers rogue script browser peril

Oops! Scam warning service left eggfaced

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Updated Rogue scripts on the scam advice website Better Business Bureau have sparked security concerns.

The issue was brought to our attention by Kevin, a server security consultant who said he informed BBB of the apparent problem on Saturday.

"I noticed a javascript redirect on the BBB Blogs site that seems to attempt to spawn an iframe to download (now deactivated) malware," he explained.

Kevin reckons the rogue script - captured in screenshots posted on imageshack here and here - was still running on the site on Monday afternoon.

"The malware link IS live, but the malware distribution page it's linking to seems to have gotten shutdown," Kevin clarified.

The Better Business Bureau was set up to provide small business in the US with advice on avoiding scams so it's a particular embarrassing place for links to malware to appear.

We exchanged messages with the Better Business Bureau on Monday afternoon and understand these messages have been passed on to the site's technicians.®

Bootnote

Better Business Bureau spokeswoman Katherine Hutt sent The Reg this statement:

BBB’s blog site, which is hosted by WordPress, was attacked by an unknown source over the weekend. The remote site that the hacker attempted to load did not work and does not appear to have been a significant security threat to BBB or any of its users. BBB runs several WordPress sites and only one was breached.

Chris Garver, Senior VP and Chief Information Officer with the Council of Better Business Bureaus, ran a thorough security check today and verified that the site is now clean. He is continuing to review the situation to determine how the attack was performed.

The bbb.org website receives over 6 million visitors a month who use BBB Business Reviews to look for trustworthy businesses and charities. After the Business Reviews, the blog is one of the most popular destinations on the site.

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables
Why mess with armoured 10kV cables when land-based, and legal, snoop tools are easier?
Early result from Scots indyref vote? NAW, Jimmy - it's a SCAM
Anyone claiming to know before tomorrow is telling porkies
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
China hacked US Army transport orgs TWENTY TIMES in ONE YEAR
FBI et al knew of nine hacks - but didn't tell TRANSCOM
Microsoft to patch ASP.NET mess even if you don't
We know what's good for you, because we made the mess says Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.