Feeds

Crazy pot smokers get high on wireless power

'Turn on the radio, man'. 'Hey radio, I love you'

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Wireless Power Consortium is promising to demonstrate more than 60 new products next week, heralding a new wave of battery charging for people too stoned to plug in their phones.

That's according to the makers of one of the products to be shown, the eponymous GetPowerPad, who recently announced it was in the last stages of testing by "innovators, trend watchers, artists, trendsetters, bloggers, role models, some crazy pot smokers". GetPowerPad will get its first live demonstration at CEATEC next week, along with car dashboards, clocks, Wi-Fi routers and assorted furniture incorporating induction-charging loops.

Those loops all conform to the Qi standard, which enables devices to communicate their power needs when placed atop a charging loop, regardless of the manufacturer. Loops can support multiple devices, and companies including General Motors have agreed to fit Qi-compatible loops into their products.

Most of the offerings shown at the CEATEC event will be simple mats like those already offered by PowerMat (soon to be branded Duracell), but induction-pioneer Fulton demonstrated a kitchen-top loop which could run a blender back in 2008 - so expect to see some kitchen-based demos and probably a car or two from GM incorporating the technology.

The home-grown enthusiast will probably have more use for some sort of coffee table model, though the standalone mats could be usefully dual-function.

None of this matters until someone starts building Qi technology into devices as well as furniture. Right now users need replacement back panels, or wrap-around cases, depending on what they're trying to charge, but those are expensive and cumbersome; to be successful the technology has to be integrated.

With charging over micro-USB becoming so widely adopted, despite its slow power delivery, half the reasoning behind wireless charging has gone. Not having to connect a plug is cool, but hardly a killer feature as demonstrated by the lacklustre sales of Palm's TouchStone charging cradle.

But perhaps we're just not stoned enough to see the appeal. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.