Feeds

Brits registering .uk domains mostly get first choice

Don't fancy yours much

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Most Brits think it's easy to find a .uk address for their websites, but almost half admit to having settled on a domain that was not their first choice, according to a new survey.

The report, commissioned by .uk manager Nominet, may add fuel to the debate over whether the plan from global internet policy overseer ICANN to dramatically increase the number of top-level domains on the internet meets a market need.

The survey of 1,086 randomly selected .uk domain name registrants conducted by ComRes in the first week of September found that a whopping 86 per cent think that registering a .uk name that they want was very easy or fairly easy.

However, 40 per cent of the people who thought the process was easy also admitted that they had to register an alternative address because their first choice was already registered to somebody else.

ComRes found that 44 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement: "The website address I want is unavailable, so I have to create and register an alternative .uk address."

A further 17 per cent said they registered a domain in .com, or in another extension, when they were unable to buy their first-choice .uk address.

Just four per cent said they ended up buying their address from a domainer – somebody who had registered it first in order to sell it on at a higher price.

The survey was carried out at Nominet's behest to help inform a policy working group tasked with potentially reforming how expiring .uk domain registrations are handled.

But the data also feeds into the ongoing debate about whether there is a sufficient scarcity of desirable domain names to warrant ICANN's huge expansion of the top-level domains market, which is due to kick off in January.

Supporters of ICANN's new gTLD program say that more extensions will increase choice and alleviate the scarcity that has forced entrepreneurs to create increasingly bizarre company names to match impossible-to-spell .com domain names.

But critics, such as executives from the US Association of National Advertisers and former ICANN chairman Esther Dyson have disputed this claim, saying that more extensions will merely force companies to pay more to protect their brands online.

An ICANN-commissioned study [PDF] last December concluded that scarcity was not a pervasive problem. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T dangles gigabit broadband plans over 100 US cities
So soon after a mulled Google Fiber expansion, fancy that
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
Turnbull gave NBN Co NO RULES to plan blackspot upgrades
NBN Co faces huge future Telstra bills and reduces fibre footprint
NBN Co plans fibre-to-the-basement blitz to beat cherry-pickers
Heading off at the pass operation given same priority as blackspot fixing
NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER
Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.