Feeds

Hitachi GST flashes HP 3PAR OEM deal

My SSD plus your array equals happiness

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

HP 3PAR has picked Hitachi GST flash drives to speed array data access.

HP 3PAR F-Class, T-Class, and V-Class (P10000) can ship with a 3.5-inch version of Hitachi GST's SSD400S, the 2.5-inch solid state drive (SSD) co-developed with Intel and using 34nm single level cell flash. It was first announced in November 2010 but OEM SSD qualification takes a long time.

The specs are unchanged except that we have visibility into Fibre Channel performance compared to the originally announced 6Gbit/s SAS interface product.

The drive does 41,000 random read IOPS, 21,000 random writes, and up to 516MB/sec sequential reads and 458MB/sec sequential writes when using the SAS interface. HP is using a 4Gbit/s Fibre Channel interface product and that exhibits 390MB/sec sequential read bandwidth and 340MB/sec when sequentially writing. Wow: you really pay for the Fibre Channel compatibility.

Out of interest let's just contrast these numbers with Anobit's Genesis 2 multi-level cell (MLC) SSD, bearing in mind that 2-bit MLC is inherently slower than SLC flash. The Anobit drive does 70,000 random read IOPS, 40,000 random writes, and 510MB/sec sequential I/O through its 6Gbit/s SAS or SATA interface. It has significantly better random I/O performance and roughly equivalent sequential performance to the Hitachi GST drive; cool.

Hitachi GST's own recent MLC SSD400M drive does 56,000 random read and 24,000 random write IOPS, both better than the SSD400S, and 495MB/sec sequential reads and 385MB/sec sequential writes with its 6gig SAS interface. These sequential numbers are not as good as the SSD400S's 6 gig SAS performance, but it is better than its 4 gig Fibre Channel numbers.

The Intel-based Ultrastar SSD400S's performance is nothing to get too excited about – not now, almost a year after it was announced (such is the pace of development in SSD land). But it will still make the 3PAR arrays significantly more responsive than if they relied solely on hard disk drives.

Flash is what makes the drive array world go round these days and Western Digital will be happy to inherit this deal when/if its Hitachi GST acquisition completes. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
729 teraflops, 71,000-core Super cost just US$5,500 to build
Cloud doubters, this isn't going to be your best day
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Managing SSL certificates with ease
The lack of operational efficiencies and compliance pitfalls associated with poor SSL certificate management, and how the right SSL certificate management tool can help.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.