Feeds

Pirate party hauls in Berlin state election booty

Angela's party came second. Awwww Arrr

Security for virtualized datacentres

Piratenpartei Deutschland, the German Pirate Party, has won 8.9 per cent of votes cast in Berlin's state elections. It is the highest vote share the oddballs have ever received in Germany, and early estimates suggest the vote earns it 14 or 15 seats in the 130-seat Berlin regional parliament. The vote also saw a 17.6 per cent vote for the Greens in a strong gesture against the established parties.

In Berlin, the Piratenpartei added populist policies such as free rides on the underground (to be subdised by the taxpayer), and legalising marijuana, to their traditional single issue of curtailing creators' human rights, which is the party's raison d'être.

Since Berlin has a debt larger than many countries, at €62bn, it is no more likely that the PP's free-riding policy will be implemented than its freeloading policy. Much as Germany, as a nation, subsidises the feckless and economically incapable states of the European Union, the productive parts of the German nation must subsidise the non-stop party city.

The Pirate Parties like to describe themselves as a movement "for personal liberty" and "human rights". But this is based on a rather selective idea of the application of those rights. Creators, for example, would be discriminated against.

And they should remember to enjoy it while they can. A German Eurosceptic party might gain 40 to 50 per cent of the popular vote, according to a poll conducted for Bild am Sonntag.

And in recent national elections Pirate have flopped. Early gains by the Swedish Pirates fell apart in the 2010 general election last year, while the UK Pirate Party fielded nine candidates in the 2010 General Election, averaging just 140 votes per seat: less than half the average number of spoiled ballot papers (289) in each constituency.

What's surprising is that with major parties failing to provide imaginative policies, and generally tainted by their "consensus" support, it's surprising there aren't more protest votes. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.