Feeds

Go Daddy mass hack points surfers towards malware

Password-snaffling miscreants hijack 445 sites

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Hundreds of Go Daddy sites were compromised to point towards a site hosting malware last weekend.

The mass hack of around 445 sites involved the injection of hostile code into the .htaccess files of the sites. Go Daddy quickly removed the hostile code before working with its customers to take back full control of the sites, which were reportedly compromised by a password hack.

Go Daddy’s chief information security officer, Todd Redfoot, told Domain Name Wire: "The accounts were accessed using the account holder’s username and password.”

It's unclear how the passwords needed to pull off the attack were obtained, but some sort of targeted phishing attack is one likely explanation. Go Daddy's investigation into the attack continues but Redfoot suggested the blame for the mass hack was outside Go Daddy's control.

"This was not an infrastructure breakdown and should not impact additional customers," he said.

Web security monitoring firm Securi warned of the mass hack on Thursday. Its blog post about the attack suggests the malicious code was targeted towards surfers visiting the affected domains via Google or other search engines rather than those who had arrived directly. Such trickery is often part and parcel of search engine manipulation attacks designed to redirect surfers hunting for content related to items in the news towards scareware portals.

This kind of trickery often takes advantage of insecure WordPress installations and the like, so the apparent use of password-snaffling trickery in this case suggests the bad guys are becoming more aggressive in their hunt for sites they can abuse for their own malicious ends. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.