Feeds
75%
Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

Tubular belle?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Accessory of the Week There is no shortage of small speakers for phones and music players, but few deliver much in the way of welly, or even sound quality.

Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

Not that you should expect a pristine hi-fi experience when you're using an ad hoc speaker such as Scorche's new BoomCan, but it's capable of pumping out a reasonably loud sound.

The BoomCan is a 56mm cylinder - with 45mm radius - that has a 40mm speaker cone at one end, a non-slip base at the other and, between the two, a built-in rechargeable battery and a basic, 2.5W amp.

Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

Plays any sound source with a 3.5mm jack

Control is limited to a tiny three-position slider on the base - the BoomCan is either off, on at "mid" volume, or on at "max" volume.

The speaker comes with a cable that sprouts a mini and a full-size USB connector at one end and a 3.5mm audio jack at the other. The latter you connect to the source, the mini USB to the BoomCan.

Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

You can see the speaker cone vibrating

Plug the full-size USB connector into an AC adaptor - not included - or a computer's USB port, and you charge up the speaker's 330mAh battery - good, the company claims, for seven hours' playback, and my experience gave me no reason to dispute that.

Each BoomCan has its own 3.5mm audio output, the notion being that you daisy-chain a series of them for a bigger, but still mono, sound. Alas, Scosche only sent me a single BoomCan so I couldn't try this out. At less than £20 a pop, adding new BoomCans isn't going to break the bank.

Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

The switch on the base runs from off, through 'mid' volume, to 'max' volume

RH Recommended Medal

As will all mini speakers, the BoomCan can sound a tad raw when set to max and playing tracks that have been mixed loud. But it generally manages to add enough bass to avoid sounding excessively tinny, and pumps out enough volume to keep, say, a picnic in the park in background music without offending passers-by. Yet it doesn't lose clarity. Not a bad sound at all. ®

Reg Hardware chooses its Accessory of the Week every Friday. Got one in mind you want us to consider? Please let us know

More Accessory of the Week Winners

Panasonic
DMW-LVF1
Vogel's
RingO
Motorola
Atrix
Lapdock
iLuv ICK826
iPad 2 case and
Bluetooth keyboard
Octovo
Solis e-book
Reader Lamp

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

75%
Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

Scosche BoomCan mini travel speaker

Very compact travel speaker that'll play from anything with a 3.5mm audio socket and delivers a surprisingly good sound for its size.
Price: £20 RRP

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
A moment of brilliance? UPnP for Internet of Stuff lightbulbs
Thus doth tech of future illuminate present, etc
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.